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Motorists stung with £1million of fines from hated LTN in London

  • Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTNs) have induced division up and down the UK 

A Labour-run council is raking in £1 million a month after stinging motorists who journey by way of its hated Low Traffic Neighbourhood (LTN), in accordance with new information. 

In the final 11 months, Hammersmith and Fulham council have issued 341,000 penalty cost notices from simply 5 cameras within the hated South Fulham west LTN. 

The council raised £8 million from 105,000 fines between February and December final 12 months with an extra 34,507 fines are nonetheless ‘open’ which might see the council land an extra £4.5 million if all are paid on the full charge. 

The hated visitors scheme – which covers New Kings Road, Wandsworth Bridge and the River Thames – was launched in December 2022.

Around £20,000 was spent on highway markings and signage with an extra £10,000 used for promotion letters and leaflets. 

Hammersmith and Fulham council have issued 341,000 penalty charge notices from just five cameras in the hated South Fulham west LTN

Hammersmith and Fulham council have issued 341,000 penalty cost notices from simply 5 cameras within the hated South Fulham west LTN

The South Fulham LTN covers New Kings Road, Wandsworth Bridge and the River Thames and was introduced in December 2022

The South Fulham LTN covers New Kings Road, Wandsworth Bridge and the River Thames and was launched in December 2022

Hundreds of LTNs were widely rolled out during the pandemic by cash-strapped councils

Hundreds of LTNs have been broadly rolled out through the pandemic by cash-strapped councils 

One resident advised the Telegraph: ‘It is blindingly apparent that the infrastructure supporting this bare money-making scheme is just not match for goal. 

‘This is a cynical greenwashing scheme which diverts visitors elsewhere, does nothing to avoid wasting the planet and advantages the richer residents of South Fulham residing contained in the leafy inexperienced streets, on the expense of these residents residing alongside the principle roads.’

Hundreds of LTNs have been broadly rolled out by cash-strapped councils through the pandemic in a bid to scale back the variety of automobiles travelling by way of an space.

The visitors calming scheme works through the use of planters or limitations to cease visitors with the ability to drive alongside a sure route in hope that it’ll make roads extra pedestrian-friendly and cut back air air pollution.

Yet the scheme has divided communities throughout the nation – whereas some say it does make areas safer and fewer polluted others branded them an assault on motorists and blamed them for merely pushing visitors onto different roads.

Impacted locals concern for ambulances struggling to get by way of, visitors gridlock on surrounding roads and the impression on native companies because of the schemes, which have already generated an estimated £100million of revenue for native councils. 

Earlier this month, transport minister Mark Harper lashed out on the ‘anti-motorist’ schemes accusing councils of utilizing them as money cows as he unveiled a clampdown on their introduction.

He argued that Tories have been ‘on the facet of motorists’ as he offered new steering for native authorities that obliges them to contemplate whether or not residents help the implementation of an LTN

Mr Harper mentioned that there have been ‘examples of councils the place ‘a council hasn’t taken its local people with them’ – citing two schemes in Newcastle and South London.

A protest held against low-traffic neighbourhoods in Ealing, West London, in April 2021

A protest held in opposition to low-traffic neighbourhoods in Ealing, West London, in April 2021

The Transport Secretary Mark Harper said the Tories were 'on the side of motorists' as he presented new guidance for local authorities that obliges them to consider whether residents support the implementation of an LTN.

The Transport Secretary Mark Harper mentioned the Tories have been ‘on the facet of motorists’ as he offered new steering for native authorities that obliges them to contemplate whether or not residents help the implementation of an LTN.

In May last year, a bollard on Temple Street off Cowley Road in Oxford was knocked down and placed in the adjacent planters - just 24 hours after being installed

In May final 12 months, a bollard on Temple Street off Cowley Road in Oxford was knocked down and positioned within the adjoining planters – simply 24 hours after being put in 

‘Some councils have carried out it and the evaluation is that they’re elevating cash,’ he advised Sky News.

‘This is a couple of system that signifies that councils correctly steadiness the wants of motorists and different highway customers, not an anti-motorist scheme pitting totally different highway customers in opposition to one another is just not useful and never wise.

‘That is what we try to cease. The different political events don’t have anything to say about it, we’re on the facet of drivers and different highway customers and we predict they’ll co-exist sensibly.’ 

The Department for Transport revealed draft statutory steering for councils on LTNs setting out that they have to acquire buy-in from native residents, companies and emergency companies when contemplating implementing new schemes. 

If councils fail to ship highway schemes that work for native individuals, they may see future funding withdrawn and the Government might take management of an authority’s roads, below powers from the Traffic Management Act 

The new laws, which is able to asses whether or not councils have ‘broadly mismanaged’ its LTN insurance policies, is because of come into place this summer time. 

MailOnline has contacted Hammersmith and Fulham council. 

The council advised The Times that ‘fines have tumbled by virtually 80 per cent’ and that no enterprise had closed due to the LTN.