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Yosemite National Park vacationers are slammed for disgusting act

Inconsiderate tourists have been blasted for leaving used toilet paper strewn across a walking trail at Yosemite National Park. 

Pictures of around a dozen discarded sheets of toilet paper alongside a nearly full roll were posted to park’s official Instagram page. 

The revolting rubbish was discarded in front of Rancheria Falls, and according to park rangers, this isn’t the first time this has happened.

‘Unfortunately, this is a sight that’s become all too familiar in Yosemite, even in wilderness areas,’ the park wrote in the post, which has over 12,000 likes.

One commenter on the post summed up the general frustration by writing: ‘I hate humans.’

Around a dozen discarded sheets of toilet paper were found by National Park Service rangers, who later posted the photos to Instagram

Around a dozen discarded sheets of toilet paper were found by National Park Service rangers, who later posted the photos to Instagram

Another made a supportive reference to Thanos in their clapback, a character in Marvel’s Avengers films who snaps his fingers and wipes out half of the universe’s population.

‘I don’t hate to say it but Thanos was right. We have way too many people,’ they wrote criticizing the toilet paper litterers.

The park officials didn’t belittle whoever is responsible, but did offer suggestions on how they should conduct themselves on their next visit.

‘If you bring toilet paper out on your trips, please pack it out too. You can bring a sealable plastic baggie to stash it in, and even cover the bag in tape so you don’t have to look at it.

‘Nobody wants to stumble upon a surprise package left behind by an anonymous outdoor enthusiast,’ the park wrote.

Some even said dog poop bags would be preferable to what these people did.

The park also revealed there are environmental concerns when it comes to hikers burying toilet paper.

The park revealed that toilet paper doesn't decompose for 1 to 3 years, presenting an environmental concern

The park revealed that toilet paper doesn’t decompose for 1 to 3 years, presenting an environmental concern

‘It’s easily exposed by weather and erosion, and animals can dig it up and disperse it long before it decomposes (which can take 1-3 years, depending on conditions),’ the park wrote.

Some animals could end using the toilet paper for nesting material, the park also warned.

‘Let’s keep things clean and classy out there, by packing out whatever you carry in, the park’s post concluded.

The toilet paper in the photos didn’t appear to be marked, leading many to speculate that a group of women who had to urinate were behind this.

One woman made that especially clear in her comment.

‘Ladies (yes you!) you don’t need to leave your TP behind for a quick tinkle. Shove it in your pocket and carry on. My gosh, you won’t die before you find a trash can,’ she wrote.

‘Oddly, I see women doing this a lot more than men (they can’t shake it off),’ another person wrote.

Two women pose for a photo at Rancheria Falls, where the toilet paper was found

Two women pose for a photo at Rancheria Falls, where the toilet paper was found

Yosemite National Park covers a 747,956-acre section of east-central California, and it’s home to hundreds of wildlife species and over a thousand plant species.

President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill in June 1864 protecting the lands in the Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove. 

Congress officially designated it a national park on October 1, 1890, making it the third national park after Yellowstone and Sequoia.